Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

False historians should be executed as counterfeiters.
M. Cervantes
In the post, myths and theories will be considered one way or another connected with the Great Patriotic War. Some of these myths are invented purposefully, some is a simple delusion or illiteracy. However, it does not matter what purpose the people who were imposing them guided or are guided, it is important to have an impartial knowledge of the history of the events of that War ...
Denials of myths will be submitted rather thesis so as not to overload the reader, and the refuted myths are presented in the same way.1

The myth of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.
One of the most common is the myth of the so-called Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, or rather, the reasons for signing this agreement. It is alleged that Stalin was so afraid of Hitler that he wanted to become his ally and help in the war against Europe, and that, as a result, the signing of the treaty proved unprofitable for the USSR. In fact, the signing of this pact was a political victory for the USSR.Without any material or human losses, the Soviet Union was able to:
postpone the beginning of the war, which gave time to prepare the army and strengthen the defense;
to destroy the Japanese’s plans to strike at the USSR with a second front, which they all tried to achieve - the signing of the pact forced them to ask for a truce on Khalkhin Gol;
get an independent Baltic in the sphere of their interests, and then attach it, while avoiding opposition from Germany and the West;
to join Western Ukraine and Western Belarus - the entry of new western territories into the Soviet Union allowed the German tanks to significantly increase their way to the key cities of the USSR (on average, they moved 600 km to the west during the Soviet border);
prevent the creation of a coalition of Germany and Europe against the USSR, which subsequently forced Hitler to fight on two fronts.2

Myth: The USSR attacked weak Poland, thereby supporting the Third Reich.
The USSR really conducted a military campaign against Poland in September 1939, dividing its territory with Germany. But this event is interpreted by many completely wrong.
Germany’s plans for an attack on Poland and possible USSR reactions
Already after the war at the Nuremberg process, it was established that on April 11, 1939, that is, long before the signing of the non-aggression pact with the USSR, Hitler approved the “White Plan” of the attack on Poland, and on April 3 he marked his date - no later than 01/09/1939 Thus, the initiative to start the war and the seizure of Poland did not belong to the USSR, and it was intended to carry out the plan of attack regardless of the position of the USSR.
Before the USSR, there was a choice between complete non-intervention, attempts to support Poland, or by taking part in its next section. Obviously, non-intervention was the most unfavorable option - to give all of Poland to Germany would mean to excessively bring closer to the Soviet industrial centers and excessively strengthen the 3rd Reich hostile to the communists and Russians, which could further attack the USSR in coalition with other European countries. Yes, and the USSR could not just give the Nazis the inhabitants of Western Ukraine and Belarus.
The reluctance of Poland to cooperate with the USSR
When asked what prevented the Soviet Union from supporting Poland in the war with Germany, the answer is simple: Poland simply did not want the support of the USSR. Moreover, less than a year before the Polish campaign, Poland herself was not averse to being on the side of Germany in a future war with the USSR.
From a letter from the Ambassador of Poland to Germany, U.Lipsky, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland J. Beck dated October 1, 1938:
“In the case of the Polish-Soviet conflict, the German government will take a more than benevolent position towards Poland. At the same time, he made it clear that the German government would help <. ...> It is absolutely incredible that the Reich could not help Poland in its struggle with the Soviets "
From the conversation of the Counselor of the German Embassy in Poland R. Shelia with the Vice-Director of the Political Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Poland M. Kobylyansky:
“If Carpathian Rus withdraws to Hungary, Poland will subsequently agree to take the side of Germany in the campaign against the Soviet Ukraine.”
From the conversation of the Counselor of the Embassy of Germany in Poland R. Shelia with the envoy of Poland to Iran J. Karsho-Sedlevsky dated December 28, 1938:
“For Poland, it’s better to definitely take the side of Germany before the conflict, since the territorial interests of Poland in the west and the political goals of Poland in the east, above all in Ukraine, can only be achieved through the advance of the Polish-German agreement. He, Karsho-Sedlevsky, will subordinate his activities as the Polish envoy in Tehran to the implementation of this great Eastern concept, as it is necessary,eventually convincing and encouraging the Persians and Afghans to play an active role in the future war against the Soviets. ”
In 1938, Poland did not allow Soviet troops to come to the aid of Czechoslovakia when Hitler annexed it. Moreover, for this, after the seizure of Czechoslovakia, Hitler allowed Poland to annex a part of Czechoslovakia (Cieszyn region).
Poland refused to accept Soviet assistance even in August 1939, when a military clash between the 3rd Reich and Poland became almost inevitable. So, on August 19, the Marshal of the Polish Army Edward Reeds-Smigly proudly declared:
“Regardless of the consequences, not a single inch of Polish territory will ever be allowed to occupy Russian troops.”3

Myth: USSR launched World War II
The theory that the USSR unleashed World War II is actually quite old, it was developed by Josef Goebbels, in order to justify the invasion of Russia. But the topic of popularity gained after the publication of the scandalous book “Icebreaker” by writer and former intelligence officer Vladimir Rezun, now living in Britain and writing his books under the mocking pseudonym “Victor Suvorov”.In the book “Icebreaker”, as well as in the books “Day M”, “Last Republic”, “Suicide”, “Purification” and so on, Suvorov-Rezun consistently develops the thesis that the USSR allegedly initiated World War II of war.
The books of Suvorov-Rezun are full of factual errors, juggling and just plain lies. Despite this, he has quite a few supporters, including in Russia. As a “debriefing” Rezun-Suvorov recommended reading:
“How Victor Suvorov Compiled History” by Vladimir Gryzun is an excellent stylobnaya book, written easily and with a fair amount of healthy humor.
"Antisuvorov" Alexei Isaev - a much more "academic", but no less interesting book.
Equalizing "Stalinism and Nazism."
This myth became widespread in the west and became the official historical version in many countries, with legalized Russophobia, such as Poland, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia. At present, in the European Union, they are increasingly trying to equate Hitler and Stalin, fascism and communism. In particular, it is for this purpose that the history of the Second World War is being rewrittenlies, distortion and hushing up of facts are used - all in order to “equalize” the responsibility of the USSR and Germany for initiating war, or even to declare the USSR the main culprit.
In 2009, deputies of the European Parliament adopted a declaration to celebrate the day "in memory of the victims of Stalinism and Nazism" on August 23, when the "Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact" was concluded. In 2011, a statement was posted on the official website of the US Embassy in Estonia: "On this day ... Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union took steps that put Europe and the whole world on the verge of imminent war."
In Poland, the Ministers of Justice of the European Union countries adopted the “Warsaw Declaration”, in which they declared the USSR’s direct responsibility for unleashing World War II.4

Hushing up the Munich Agreement
Western historians all forget that before the "Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact" there was a "Munich Agreement" of Germany, Italy, Great Britain and France. September 29, 1938 Britain was represented by N. Chamberlain, France by E. Daladier, Nazi Germany by A. Hitler, and fascist Italy by B. Mussolini. The so-called civilized countries sanctioned Hitler’s attack on Czechoslovakia.Now Western propaganda is diligently trying to erase the truth from the history books and shift its blame on the USSR. Already, few people remember the words of Churchill:
“England was offered a choice between war and dishonor. She chose dishonor and will get the war. ”
In the same years, US Ambassador to Spain K. Bowers said:
“... the“ Munich world ”overnight brought France to the position of a pathetic second-rate power, depriving her friends and universal respect, and England struck such a crushing blow that she had not received in the past 200 years. A century and a half ago, Chamberlain would have been put in the Tower for such a world, and Daladier would be executed on the guillotine. ”
As a result of the betrayal of the western countries, Hitler received the Sudetenland of Czechoslovakia with highly developed industry. The Škoda Czechoslovak plants produced a huge amount of military equipment for the Nazi army, which dramatically increased the military power of Germany before the attack on Poland.
Perhaps the loudest victim of communism and Nazism, Poland itself, along with Hitler, took part in the division of Czechoslovakia. Simultaneously with the Nazi army, Polish troops entered Czechoslovakia and captured the Cieszyn region.5
Hushing up negotiations on a possible pact of the USSR, Great Britain and France6
.
Before the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, there were still Moscow talks. The USSR, Great Britain and France attempted to agree on repelling German aggression. Negotiations moved slowly, the British and the French in every possible way delayed them. The British delegation was able to leave only after 10 days and the longest way: by sea to Leningrad and further by train to Moscow. Then it turned out that the head of the British delegation, Admiral Drax, did not have any written powers at all. Negotiations rose to the “dead center” on the issue of Poland. The Poles firmly refused to provide two corridors through their territory for the advance of the Soviet army to Germany.
American journalist William Shearer argues:
“... England and France have advanced in this matter (note: in the matter of negotiations) far, but not far enough. It is also clear from these documents that the Poles showed inconceivable folly. ”
The stubbornness of the Poles led them to disaster. The head of the French military mission, General Dumenc, reported from Moscow to Paris:
“There is no doubt that the USSR wants to conclude a military pact and does not want us to turn this pact into an empty piece of paper that does not have a specific meaning.The failure of negotiations is inevitable, if Poland does not change the position "
Between the parties was a high degree of distrust. The USSR and Great Britain simultaneously conducted secret negotiations with Germany. The circumstances were such that the USSR was able to reach an agreement with Germany in order to postpone the beginning of the inevitable war. And this happened after the "Munich Agreement" and the attack on Czechoslovakia.7

Myth: Hitler first attacked Stalin, because Stalin was going to attack Hitler first.
The myth that Stalin planned to attack Hitler is one of the oldest and unfounded myths, but in our time he has not lost popularity with the liberal society that hates the USSR. Of course, the Soviet government did not plan to attack Germany, and all large-scale reforms of the army were not connected with the preparation of an attack, but with protection against a possible attack. The German version of the preventive war was completely exposed at the Nuremberg Trials.
The myth was originally born in the summer of 1941, when German propagandists and Hitler himself announced that the Soviet Union was going to attack Germany from the rear - this is how the Nazis explained to the German people the need to attack the USSR.However, on closed military councils, shortly before the war, the German command had a different opinion. In particular, the Chief of the General Staff of the Ground Forces of Germany, Colonel-General F. Halder, after analyzing intelligence information, said:
"Russia will do everything to avoid war."
And on May 7, 1941, Goebbels wrote the following phrase in his diary:
“Russians still do not seem to suspect anything. They are deploying their troops in such a way that their position meets our goals, we can’t and want the best ... ”
The Soviet Union was not ready for an offensive war with Germany in 1941. Soviet military campaign against Finland in 1939-1940 clearly showed the fact that the USSR army was not in the best condition. By 1941, the country's economy was not transferred to martial law, and the release of the latest models of military equipment was just beginning. The Soviet command was well aware of all this and did everything so as not to provoke the Germans to attack. As G. K. Zhukov wrote:
"All the thoughts and actions of Stalin at this time were permeated with one desire - to avoid war or delay its start dates and the confidence that he would succeed."8

Myth: Stalin knew that there would be a German attack, but he did nothing.
In fact, there were more than 80 authoritative reports on the date of the start of Germany’s war, reports about this came constantly and called more and more new dates.
From the beginning of the 41st year, such intelligence came regularly, but the attack did not occur and Germany did not actively prepare for it by external signs. As a result, the Soviet military leadership concluded that the most likely invasion of the USSR would not happen until Germany defeated Britain. The option that Hitler would decide to fight the war on two fronts was considered suicidal for Germany and therefore unlikely The Third Reich to a complete disaster).
Stalin's mistake was that he considered the latest reports of the attack on the USSR to be misguided, which the United Kingdom spread to provoke the USSR and divert the German strike from itself. But no one doubted that sooner or later the war would be.
Of course, in anticipation of a future war, the armed forces of the USSR were in need of early modernization and an increase in the number of personnel, and the Soviet leadership was actively engaged in building up military power.According to the measures taken, the recruitment of personnel on a personnel basis has allowed an increase in the size of up to 2 million people. Significantly increased equipment troops anti-aircraft systems, guns and mortars. In 1938-40, armored forces began to be actively updated, which received the latest T-34 and KV tanks, which became famous in subsequent battles.9

The situation was complicated by the fact that the movement of the German troops to the Soviet border until the last moment was not critical and threatening. The redeployment of German troops in the eyes of the Soviet command could be explained by the plans of the Germans to cover themselves from the east during the landing on the British Isles. As a result, the time for the full deployment of the Soviet troops was lost.
Numerous sources and stuffing misinformation prevented to draw unambiguous conclusions about the time of the outbreak of war. When at the last moment the threat of attack became apparent, measures were taken immediately. In the revised full version of the memoirs of Marshal G. K. Zhukov, published in 2002, the following phrase appeared:
"There are different versions now about whether or not we knew the specific start date and plan of the war.The General Staff about the day of the attack of the German troops became known from the defector only on June 21, about which we immediately reported to JV Stalin. He immediately agreed to bring the troops on alert. Apparently, he had previously received such important information through other channels ... "
In accordance with this, Stalin made some changes and approved a military directive, which he immediately drafted and submitted for consideration by Tymoshenko and Zhukov:
Point 3. I order:
a) during the night of 22.6.41 to secretly occupy firing points of the fortified areas on the state border;
b) before dawn on June 22, 1941, disperse all aviation, including military, across field airfields, carefully disguise it;
c) bring all parts to combat readiness. Troops to keep dispersed and disguised;
d) to bring the air defense on alert without additional lifting of the subscription. Prepare all measures to darken cities and objects;
e) do not hold any other events without a special order.
But by the time of the German attack, the directive was not communicated to all parts. The famous historian Vladimir Karpov in his book “Marshal Zhukov” describes these events in the following way:
The troops did not have time to fulfill the first directive of June 21, which ordered them to occupy firing points of the fortified areas on the state border. The directive entered the troops with great delay; It turned out, as Zhukov writes in his memoirs, “that before dawn on June 22 in all the western border districts the wired communication with the troops was broken and the headquarters of the districts and armies did not have the ability to quickly transfer their orders. The sabotage group abandoned earlier by the Germans into our territory destroyed a wire connection. They killed communication delegates, attacked commanders.

Related news

  • How to protect yourself from envious
  • Scott Camp Kill
  • 263 coins and 100 nails were removed from an Indian stomach
  • What helps aloe juice
  • Production and sale of agricultural products: a selection of articles
  • Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time

    Myths about the Great Patriotic War. Part I. Pre-war time